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Posted by / 02-Mar-2020 02:19

Arranged marriages can take a variety of forms ranging from forced marriages (where either the bride or the groom, or both, have no choice in the matter) to consensual marriages (where the bride and groom have allowed outside parties to bring them together).

The clergyman is caricatured officiating the marriage with a blindfold.Some scholars argue, therefore, that arranging a marriage of a daughter, becomes a necessary means to reduce this burden.as a reason for their growing reluctance to see their daughters marry at too early an age.Arranged marriage is a type of marital union where the bride and groom are selected by individuals other than the couple themselves, particularly family members, such as the parents.Depending on culture, a professional matchmaker may be used.

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Illustrations include vani which is currently seen in some tribal / rural parts of Pakistan, and Shim-pua marriage in Taiwan before the 1970s (Tongyangxi in China).

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  2. The anthropological handbook Notes and Queries (1951) defined marriage as "a union between a man and a woman such that children born to the woman are the recognized legitimate offspring of both partners." In recognition of a practice by the Nuer people of Sudan allowing women to act as a husband in certain circumstances (the ghost marriage), Kathleen Gough suggested modifying this to "a woman and one or more other persons." In an analysis of marriage among the Nayar, a polyandrous society in India, Gough found that the group lacked a husband role in the conventional sense; that unitary role in the west was divided between a non-resident "social father" of the woman's children, and her lovers who were the actual procreators.